Monthly Archives: May 2014

MYSTERY POCKET POEMS

Such a fun idea!

LITERACY & SOCIAL JUSTICE FOR ALL

Pocket Poems

April was National Poetry Month, and since many students are poetry-phobic, I saw an opportunity to create a buzz around one of my favorite genres of literature.

Each week of April, I selected three short, easy-to-read poems, printed them out on colorful paper, folded them up, and offered them in a jar outside my classroom door with a sign inviting students to take a poem to keep with them. I selected fun little poems such as William Carlos Williams’s “Red Wheelbarrow”, Lewis Carroll’s “The Crocodile”, and Nikki Giovanni’s “Possum Crossing”. These poems are colorful, relatively easy to digest, and accessible to my students, who range from grades 5 to 8.

I put the cupcake jar out on Monday morning on a little desk beside my door, and issued an announcement about National Poetry Month, and for students to visit my door for a surprise pocket poem. Then I waited. Would…

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5 Inspirational Social Media Professors to Follow

A MEDIA MIX

Quinnipiac University Quinnipiac University

When I was in college, the closest thing to social media was Hot or Not. And while times have changed and Hot or Not is…well…not hot, plenty of other social networks are looking pretty good.

Today, social media has not only changed the way I connect and learn, but it has been my occupation for the past three years.

Today, students need to understand the widespread opportunities of social media. So when I got the chance to teach a community management course at Quinnipiac University‘s Masters of Interactive Media program this summer, I jumped at it.

Many people have sparked my excitement for teaching. Here are five of those professors. They do more than teach. They inspire.

Jeffrey L. Cohen

Jeffrey L CohenJeff is a professor teaching social media at Ball State University. He started SocialMediaB2B.com, wrote the Social Media B2B Book, and has years of…

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